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The Journal of Heart and Lung Transplantation
International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation.

Pressure–volume analysis during axial flow ventricular assist device support

Published:January 06, 2006DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.healun.2005.05.010
      The systematic assessment of cardiac recovery or the status of the left ventricle after ventricular assist device (VAD) support is difficult; however, and as Ferrari and colleagues
      • Ferrari M.
      • Kamuran K.A.
      • Mihai C.
      • et al.
      Evaluation of myocardial function in patients with end-stage heart failure during support with the Jarvik 2000 left ventricular assist device.
      appropriately identified in a recent issue of this Journal, it is tantamount to adopting strategies for targeting patients for “bridge to recovery.” The methods employed by Ferrari and colleagues to demonstrate cardiac recovery are by no means less arduous than others methods,
      • Farrar D.J.
      • Holman W.R.
      • McBride L.R.
      • et al.
      Long-term follow-up of Thoratec ventricular assist device bridge to recovery patients successfully removed from support after recovery of ventricular function.
      • Mancini D.M.
      • Beniaminovitz A.
      • Levin H.
      • et al.
      Low incidence of myocardial recovery after left ventricular assist device implantation in patients with chronic heart failure.
      • Slaughter M.S.
      • Silver M.A.
      • Farrar D.J.
      • et al.
      A new method of monitoring recovery and weaning the Thoratec left ventricular assist device.
      but their approach is laudable given that it attempts to address intrinsic contractility or the so-called “load-independent” cardiac function via end-systolic pressure–volume relationships (ESPVRs) at the time of VAD implantation and at explant. We have some comments with regard to their intriguing report.
      • Ferrari M.
      • Kamuran K.A.
      • Mihai C.
      • et al.
      Evaluation of myocardial function in patients with end-stage heart failure during support with the Jarvik 2000 left ventricular assist device.
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